Hollywood NIFF

Dromedy

Dromedy
An ambitious stand-up comedian faces the fear of censorship and the influence of political correctness on his work.
Director Biography - Christos Doulgerakis
Christos Doulgerakis (born 15 June 1986) is a filmmaker, screenwriter and photographer coming from Athens, Greece. He studied film production in Berlin, Germany and has worked in various films, photo shootings, commercials and music videos. It was sometime during the end of the previous millennium, when Christos realized his passion for films and he couldn't help, but embrace it. The consequences were inevitable. What started as a childish effort with his father's shaky handy-cam, has now developed to a more serious business. Christos is trying to make films about all those things that inspire him. Putting his experiences, thoughts and opinions on screen seems to be exactly what he wanted, as the story spreads faster and describes itself. Writing is his means of creating a story, directing is his vision for shaping it and editing the best way to put the finishing touches on this artistic expression. He never stops being thirsty for more experiences and willing to improve his skills. Dare to make him feel comfortable and his personality will unfold like rolled paper running downhill. After all, he's just an extrovert guy trying to write his own story, direct his career and edit his future to fit his favorite engagement: Filmmaking! Director Statement "Dromedy" is a short film which deals with the fear caused by the - often pointless or even excessive - use of political correctness in comedy and more specifically in stand-up comedy, an art form rapidly developing and widespread over the recent years. Stand-up comedy is a live, interactive way of entertainment, though based on monologue. As the stand-up comedian narrates quick sequences of humorous stories to the audience, the lack of a theatrical "fourth wall" directly connects the spectators' reactions to the show's success or failure. This audience-artist relationship, combined with the fact that this art operates in a dangerous area (such as that of comedy) and is practiced very quickly, makes it necessary for the artist to be constantly aware so as not to jump the thin line between satire and insult. The film remains true to jumping between thin lines, both in its subject as well as its genre, balancing between comedy, drama and horror and brings in mind movies such as "The Babadook" (2014) and "A Monster Calls” (2016), in which fear or guilt literally take shape. In the story of the film's protagonists I see past, personal experiences from encounters with the concept of fear and guilt. Both the approach of Dionisis, who chooses to turn a blind eye, and that of Xanthi, who attempts to bury her memories, feeling guilty every time she comes across the problem, are very familiar to me. But they were never the solution. So what I'm trying to achieve with this film is a solution that uses fear as a tool to produce satire. Fear as a concept is present in many aspects of our lives and it’s quite brave to acknowledge its existence and refrain from sweeping it under the carpet. Even if we manage to face it, we’ll always carry it as part of our personal story. The difference lies in how much it does affect us. That’s why I don’t really seek the complete elimination of political correctness (which in many cases is properly applied) and I certainly don’t testify an "accusation" with this film. It’s more of a "deconstruction" of the fear it causes, by using it as a solution. And when the solution comes aided by humor - one of the most powerful human “weapons” - it can easily be transformed from temporary to permanent.